What to Eat in Portugal

Wondering What To Eat In Portugal?

Over the last 10 years we’ve sampled a lot of different Portuguese food. Most of the time, it’s been a pleasure, although there are some things we will never touch (snouts, feet and ears) and others we refuse to repeat (tripe).

Fortunately for the less adventurous palate, it’s easy enough to avoid dubious ‘delicacies’ and discover why Portuguese people are fiercly proud of their food. If you’re not sure what food to try in Portugal, read on.

Note: The word ‘best’ in this context is wholly subjective and based on our preferences.

Best Portuguese cheese

Portuguese sheep and goat cheeses are delicious, whether served as a snack, appetiser or to round off a meal.

They range from the soft requeijão made from whey, usually enjoyed with doce de abórbora(Portuguese pumpkin jam) to the rock hard 18-month old cured cheese.

Tip: soak this strong cheese in olive oil and pair with a full bodied red Dão wine.

Our first choice of Portuguese cheese is always a runny (amanteigado) Serra da Estrela sheep’s cheese. A close second is the equally runny Queijo de Azeitão from the Lisbon region. Cut a lid out of the rind and scoop out the gooey goodness.

Tip: We love it with fig jam, although a caramelly honey will do. Book here this activity.

Best Portuguese bread

Bread plays an important role in traditional Portuguese cuisine and forms the basis of many hearty soups and main dishes, especially in the Alentejo region.

For white bread,our first choice is pão da avó (grandma’s bread), which is crusty, moist, full of holes and very tasty.

What we head for in a bread basket, however, is broa, especially the yellow version. Broa is Portuguese corn bread, traditionally cooked in a wood oven, with a wonderfully crunchy crust and moist innards. It’s quite dense and filling so you won’t need much.

Tip: Broa makes a great base for sardines and grilled peppers, popular food in Portugal, especially in June.

Book here a bread experience tour.

someone making bread